Breathtaking Three Hummock Island sits just off the coast of North West Tasmania. It is a magical place of granite coastlines, protected coves, sweeping beaches and surprising diversity.

Three Hummock Island has one of the purest environments on the planet - crystal clear water, white sandy beaches, inland lakes and forests remain largely untouched.

Twenty kilometres away, a Baseline Air Pollution Station consistently measures the air as the cleanest in the world. 

Many paths on the island take you to locations of exceeding beauty. By climbing some 237 metres up South Hummock - the highest point - you can take in a view of the island, nearby Hunter Island and mainland Tasmania. 

Birdlife abounds on the island, with over 90 species recorded.  Wild ducks, black swans and eagles frequent the small lakes behind the sand dunes lining the beaches. A wide variety of sea birds are seen around the coast, including international visitors that come to the Island to breed. Short-tailed Shearwaters are a spectacular sight as they return in thousands to their rookeries at dusk, and penguins can be observed making their nightly trip up the beach to their nests during the summer months.

We love to welcome guests to our secluded paradise.  Escape to Three Hummock Island for a memorable getaway.  

 

A Bit of History

For many centuries, the island was a summer hunting ground for Aboriginal people of the North West tribe, who reached the island by swimming across five kilometres of open water from nearby Hunter Island.

Its European discoverers were Bass and Flinders, who named the island in 1798. More explorers, shipwrecked mariners and sailors followed.  

Giuseppe Garibaldi, the famous uniter of Italy, landed on the island in 1852 and left it with this accolade:

“O desert island of the Hunter Group – how many times have you pleasantly excited my imagination. When tired of this civilized society, so full of tyrants and gendarmes, I have often transported myself in my imagination into your gracious bosom.”

In 1978 the majority of the 7,400 hectares was declared a Nature Reserve; and in 2001 a State Reserve.

From 1932 until 1951, the island was run as a farm by Cissie and Bill Nichols until John and Eleanor Alliston took over with their four children, Venetia, Robert, Warwick and Ingrid. The family maintained a presence on the island until 2006. Eleanor Alliston is the author of "Escape to an Island" and "An Island Affair", which tell of her family's adventurous years living on Three Hummock.